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Kashmir’s High Price for Demanding Independence

by Maryam Ansar

With rising tensions between Pakistan and India in recent days over the Uri attacks, it comes as no surprise that Kashmiri civilians have been caught in the middle of a tug of war between both countries.

Whilst the two nuclear powers battle out their differences in stalemate over the security and future of Kashmir on either side of the Line of Control; the human right abuses towards its people have been brushed under the carpet – such disregard is catastrophic. Attempts to bring the Kashmir conflict to light on the international platform have been pitiful to say the least. Reports have surfaced suggesting Nawaz Sharif’s foreign affairs advisor, Sartaj Aziz, has requested an ‘impartial’ international probe into the Uri attacks; his 7e3de5fd-f686-45ca-abcf-d31a1a086eb5attempt at diplomacy is credible, but not nearly good enough, it is diverting away from the real issue at hand, the plight of the Kashmiris and their biddings. The response of our world leaders in isolating the Kashmir conflict has allowed individuals to take matters into their own hands, and raise awareness towards this devastation as a unified front.

Three wars have been fought over Kashmir’s territory in nearly seven decades, yet the use of systematic torture in Indian administered land is rife, with prospects for improvement looking bleak in the current climate unless the international platform is properly informed. It has been less than six months since news erupted of pellet guns being used against Kashmiri protestors by the Indian Army, in an attempt to supress their voices for peace and justice. T

he images were shared by thousands, and refuted by even more, yet the back story and facts remained in the background; the Indian army were blinding peaceful protestors with pellets of lead, the result was one hundred surgeries in four days- a terrifying number when analysed on a larger scale. The term blinding certainly isn’t being used metaphorically here, the pellets have caused victims to lose their eyes and sight in one or both eyes, a horrific price to pay for envisioning freedom.

The firing of lead pellets at protestors is just one example of the torture Kashmiris suffer on a daily basis, an example that was fortunate enough to gain some momentum in mainstream media. However, for the most part, the torture inflicted on innocent civilians goes unnoticed, with virtually no coverage on well-known outlets.

Perhaps this is why a dreadful majority of an apparently well informed society is clueless towards the one in six Kashmiris who undergo suffering at the hands of its so called safe-keepers, the Indian Army. On one hand we witnessed the use of lead pellets, but on the other, we are veiled from the harrowing accounts of rape suffered by the women, and often men, of Kashmir, deserving of an entire investigation of its own. The extent and severity of these abuses is still not apparent, and to revisit Sartaj Aziz’s proposals for an impartial investigation into the Uri attacks; it would be far more fitting, as many would agree, to launch critical investigations into almost seventy years of unrest, abuse and criminality; to raise awareness within the international community instead of isolation.

 

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